Seeing Syria again

Agnès Varraine-Leca • Photographe

A. Varraine-Leca

When Agnès Varraine-Leca arrived in Lebanon, in January 2016, five years had passed since the beginning of the war in Syria. Half of the Syrian population had fled bombings and combats: 6,6 million Syrians were displaced inside the country and 4,6 million (i.e. half of Ireland’s population) had taken refuge in the neighbouring countries and all the way to Europe. In Lebanon, they represent a third of the population. For months and years most remain blocked in the country without any perspective of going back to Syria, living in increasingly precarious conditions. One year later, their situation hasn’t change. And as for seeing Syria again…

Translated from the French by Audrey Sala

This reportage was the “Coup de Cœur” at the Bourse du Talent 2016

All pictures : © Agnès Varraine-Leca www.agnesvarraineleca.com

Lebanon, Akkar, Cheikh Zennad, at the Syrian-lebanese border, January 2016. Construction of a reservoir to supply water to the village of Cheikh Zennad. About ten Syrian families have taken refuge in the village.

Lebanon, Bourj Hammoud, January 2016. In the city of Bourj Hammoud, many
 Syrian families live in substandard housing needing repair.

Lebanon, Antelias, January 2016. Syrian refugee families live on the Antelias sea front, north of Beirut. 

Lebanon, Baabda, January 2016. The Thalouj family has fled war in Syria to take refuge in Lebanon.
They have accumulated significant debts and are looking for cheaper housing. Part of the family wants to return to Syria if living conditions do not improve.

Lebanon,
Bourj Hammoud, January 2016.
One of Bourj Hammoud neighbourhoods
where many Syrian refugees live. 

Lebanon, Khalde,
January 2016.
Distribution of cards allowing Syrian refugees to buy food for US$ 21 per month in one of the 64 authorised shops in Beirut and Mount Lebanon.

 Lebanon, Saïda, nabatieh, January 2016. Hobous and her three children’s house in Natieh, South of Saïda. The Kurdish family lived in Aleppo before fleeing to Lebanon two years ago. They lack
of mattresses to sleep on and winter clothes.

Lebanon, Saïda, nabatieh, January 2016. Hobous and her three children’s house in Natieh, South of Saïda. The Kurdish family lived in Aleppo before fleeing to Lebanon two years ago. They lack
of mattresses to sleep on and winter clothes.

Lebanon, Tabarja, January 2016.
The Sahou family has lived for three years in a camp at Ouata Slam, near
to the Tabarja beach. Rain penetrates through the roof built with wooden planks and plastic sheeting. Khoder
(on the right) complains about the lack of food aid and medical care.

Lebanon, Akkar, unofficial camp of Syrian refugees “Saadine 002”, January 2016. Portrait of Amar’s daughter and grandchildren (on the left) in front of their house. 

Biography • Agnès Varraine-Leca  

Born in Marseilles in 1984, Agnès lives and works in Paris. Her photographic and humanitarian work has led her to live in Southeast Asia and the Middle East. In 2008 she worked on precariousness and in the shantytowns of the major cities in the Philippines. Based in Occupied Palestinian Territory in 2009 and 2010, she worked on the consequences of the Israeli occupation, and more specifically, on the difficulties to access health care in the West Bank. In Paris since 2012, she is interested in social movements and continues in parallel her work with NGOs, for which she regularly takes shots in France and abroad: Tanzania in 2011, Lebanon, Syria, Turkey and Jordan in 2012, Philippines in 2013 following the passage of typhoon Haiyan, Ethiopia and Liberia to cover the epidemic of Ebola in 2014 and Nepal after the earthquake in April 2015. Social and humanitarian topics are at the heart of her photographic approach.

ISBN de l’article (HTML): 978-2-37704-202-9

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