Call for papers for Humanitarian Alternatives tenth issue

In view of the publication of its tenth issue, to be released in March 2019, Humanitarian Alternatives is calling for papers under its next focus theme “Humanitarian aid in cities”. If you are an actor, a researcher or an observer of the international humanitarian community and wish to submit a proposal for an article, please send us a summary and the outline of the paper (2 pages maximum) before December 12 at the following address: contact@alternatives-humanitaires.org We will respond on December 21, at the latest.

The final deadline for submitting the article is January 28. Please observe that the article must be around 15 000 characters, including spaces (approximately 2,400 words).

Statement of issues for the “Focus” theme

N°10 – March 2019: Humanitarian aid in cities

Historically, humanitarian aid has mainly intervened in rural contexts. Yet increasing urbanisation, the rural exodus towards megacities, the “rise” of conflicts in countries structured around big urban centres with standards approaching those in Western countries, and migrations caused by conflicts, all mean that humanitarian actors are increasingly led to intervene in contexts which they do not know as well. In cities, indeed, the issues (cohabitation between urban dwellers and recently arrived rural people, the management of chronic diseases, types of combats/weapons and impacts on civilian populations), infrastructures (hospitals, health centres), and established actors (the State, public services, associations) clearly influence the conditions of intervention. Conflicts in terms of skills, governance and culture can therefore arise. Whilst their intervention is considered relevant in the case of war or natural disasters, are humanitarian actors the best placed – or indeed welcome – with regard to social issues? In any case, how can they adapt their practices to new forms of vulnerability, and to the authorities in place? What do they have to offer in cities, based on what they have developed in the countrysides? Does this continuum suggest the idea of a development/social/humanitarian nexus?

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