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The place of the child in humanitarian action and communication: moving away from the cliché of childhood as icon

V. Gorin

Valérie Gorin • Senior lecturer and researcher at the Centre of Humanitarian Studies, Geneva (University of Geneva and Graduate Institute) and member of the Humanitarian Alternatives Editorial Board

Co-editor of this issue’s Focus, with Boris Martin, Editor-in-Chief

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Editorial guidelines for authors

Humanitarian Alternatives operates on the basis of calls for contributions as well as on a commission basis. In the latter case, the review’s editorial team (the Chief Editor and the Editorial Board) will contact authors and participants who seem likely to contribute to a topic it has previously defined, whether for its Focus or its other sections (Perspectives, Transitions, Innovation, etc.). Humanitarian Alternatives also welcomes unsolicited article proposals, which it nevertheless reserves the right to retain or not.

All articles are submitted to the editorial team. Once the evaluation is completed, a notification of acceptance, rejection or request for revision is sent.

Unless the author expressly states otherwise, he or she agrees that his/her article will be published on the review’s website and may also appear on any other external media of the review’s official partners (press and internet).

We ask authors to consult us before reprinting their article in other media or disseminating it in other ways. The reproduction of all or part of published articles is subject to the prior agreement of Humanitarian Alternatives. Only the introductory paragraph may be reproduced, provided that the article is linked to the Humanitarian Alternatives website and/or that the article’s precise reference is mentioned.

For the article to be accepted, we ask that authors writing in English follow the rules listed below.

The PDF document gathering all the editorial rules listed below can be downloaded here.

 

      I.          PRESENTATION RULES

Length of the article

The average length of a text is around 2,200 words (footnotes included), subject to special agreement depending on the project.

Format

The text must be submitted in Word and in the following format:

  • Times New Roman 12 for running text and Times New Roman 10 for footnotes
  • Justified text
  • Single line spacing
  • No paragraph indents
  • Within one section, only use single line breaks (carriage return)
  • Do not use bold or underline words in the body of the text

Italics are only for:

  • titles of books and documents (reports, studies, etc.)
  • names of medias (journals, reviews, newspapers, TV channels, etc.)
  • foreign language terms
  • names of organisations in a foreign language
  • some Latin words and phrases

Headings and sub-headings

Headings should break up the text into clearly identifiable sections. Please avoid exceeding two levels of headings.

Footnotes

All book and article references should be footnoted, using Word’s automatic footnote call (References/Insert footnote). By convention, footnotes are never placed in titles. See below for details.

Presentation of the author

All articles must be accompanied by:

  • A short biography of the author describing his/her current position, institution of affiliation and professional background. Please do not exceed 135 words.
  • A photo (portrait) in colour and high definition (300dpi, min. 472×472 pixels)

Tables, graphs and maps

They must all have a brief description, a title and a source of reference. The author will have ensured in advance that their publication is authorised.

Translations

In the case of your own translation, please indicate “author’s translation” into brackets in the footnote.

Example of footnote after a translation: Jenny Edkins, Whose hunger? Concepts of Famine, Practices of Aid, University of Minnesota Press, 2000, p. 102 (author’s translation).

 

      II.         FOOTNOTES AND BIBLIOGRAPHICAL REFERENCES

Each footnote should not exceed sixty-five words.

The footnote must be entered in superscript and without parentheses. It must be placed after any punctuation mark (closing quotation mark, comma, period…), except dashes.

Bibliographical references should not be placed in the body of the text but in footnotes. With some exceptions, the text should not include a final bibliography.

First references

First references of books in English should be presented as follows:

Conor Foley, The Thin Blue Line: How Humanitarianism Went to War, Verso, 2010.

First book chapter references in English should be presented as follows:

David Trim, “Conclusion: Humanitarian intervention in historical perspective”, in Brendan Simms and David Trim (eds.), Humanitarian Intervention: A History, Cambridge University Press, 2011, pp. 381–387.

First references of academic articles in English should be presented as follows:

Katarzyna Grabska, “Constructing ‘modern gendered civilised’ women and men: gender-mainstreaming in refugee camps” in Gender and Development, vol. 19, no. 1, March 2011, pp. 81–93.

First references of newspaper articles in English should be presented as follows:

Emily Rauhala and Yasmeen Abutaleb, “U.S. says it won’t join WHO-linked effort to develop, distribute, coronavirus vaccine”, The Washington Post, 1 September 2020.

First references of documents (reports, studies, circulars, etc.) in English should be presented as follows:

If the name of the author and the name of the structure associated with the document are both available:

Megan Norbert, Humanitarian experiences with sexual violence: compilation of two years of Report the Abuse data collection, Report the Abuse, August 2017.

If the name of the author is unknown and only the name of the structure associated with the document is available:

Inter-Agency Standing Committee, IASC Guidelines on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings, January 2007.

Please note that titles of documents should always be written in italics, not in roman with quotation marks.

Subsequent references

Subsequent references will be presented as follows:

  • Books: Conor Foley, The Thin Blue Line…, op. cit., p. 23.
  • Book chapters: David Trim, “Conclusion: humanitarian intervention…”, art. cit., p. 385.
  • Academic articles: Katarzyna Grabska, “Constructing ‘modern gendered civilised’ women…”, art. cit., p. 89.
  • Newspaper articles: Emily Rauhala and Yasmeen Abutaleb, “U.S. says it won’t join…”, art. cit.
  • Documents: Inter-Agency Standing Committee, IASC guidelines on mental health…, op. cit.

Notes and clarifications regarding footnotes

References to foreign books, book chapters and articles are presented in their original language and according to the typographical standards of that language (see “Règles éditoriales” for references to books, book chapters and articles in French). In a text in English, a reference to an article in French will therefore be presented using herringbone quotation marks (« … »).

Please note:

  • In a book reference, never include the place of publication.
  • The first name of an author must always be written in full and precede the last name.
  • Use et al. only if there are more than three authors.
  • If there are two or three authors, write “and” before the name of the last author (for example: “John Watson, Michelle Gayer and Maire Connolly” and not “John Watson, Michelle Gayer, Maire Connolly”)
  • Always spell out dates in the following format: 15 February 2008
  • Page numbers: use “p.” for page and “pp.” for a group of pages
  • Page ranges should be indicated as follows, using an en-dash: p. 8–12
  • Do not include DOIs

Sources available online

When an article is available online in its entirety, the URL through which it can be accessed must be included in the reference. Please do not include the URL if the article is only available to read under a firewall.

The fact that the referenced document can be found online is not an exemption from indicating its title, author and date of publication. A footnote should not only contain an internet reference.

The references include URLs and must be presented in the following way:

Katy Long, “Syrians suffer as world plays politics with humanitarian aid”, The Conversation, 19 February 2014, https://theconversation.com/syrians-suffer-as-world-plays-politics-with-humanitarian-aid-23163

Please always remove the slash at the end of a URL.

Please do not include the date on which the link was consulted.

 

      III.         HOW TO HANDLE EDITORIAL COMMENTS

Once the author receives his/her draft article from the editorial team with editing notes and comments, it is important that the author review these changes and comments as soon as possible to return the revised draft to the editorial team.

Changes

It is important that all changes mde to the draft are apparent using the “track changes” feature so that the editorial team working on the article can easily identify differences from the previous version.

Disagreements

If the author disagrees with a revision or comment and does not wish to implement the change in the revised draft, the author should include a comment bubble arguing, in one or two sentences, his or her disagreement.

Call for papers for Humanitarian Alternatives eighth issue

In view of the publication of its 8th issue, to be released in July 2018, Humanitarian Alternatives is calling for papers under its next focus theme “The rise of new technologies: utility, misuses and meaning”. If you are an actor, a researcher or an observer of the international humanitarian community and wish to submit a proposal for an article, please send us a summary and the outline of the paper (2 pages maximum) before March 5th at the following address: contact@alternatives-humanitaires.org. We will respond within 15 days following the reception of your proposal. Continue reading

Coming soon the 6th issue “NGOs and the private sector: threat or opportunity?”

We are pleased to announce the publication of our next issue:

“NGOs and the private sector: threat or opportunity”

Discover below the presentation of the Focus and the summary of the next issue.

Publication dates:
November, 20 – Online
November, 27 – Printed edition

Presentation

For several years, the humanitarian ecosystem has been undergoing a transition. Alongside  traditional actors, the United Nations and NGOs in particular, the private sector (ie companies and company foundations) made a notable entry into the humanitarian field, either in the form of field actions or funding. More broadly, new practices (direct remittance of cash to populations, assistance delivered via lucrative networks [credit cards, mobile phones, drones, etc.] and, beyond that, managerial logics inspired by the business world [certification, evaluation, human resources management, “professionalisation”]) undoubtedly transform the aid sector.

Some see a risk of confusion when others commend a welcome extension of the actions in support of vulnerable populations, with NGOs now able to count on new partners with skills, technical means and funding that are beginning to cruelly lack.

In any case, this transformation generates many discussions and oppositions, sometimes symptomatic of a clash of cultures between companies and NGOs. And we will certainly not get out of it by falling back, as is too often the case today, on an opposition. Isn’t there a middle way between disparaging and the defence of a territory that belongs to no one?

The time has come for all of us to acknowledge this evolution. The aim of this issue is to present a global report on the situation and set the terms of a dialogue between companies and NGOs: is profit/not-for-profit still a relevant frontier? Should we impose limits on companies? What advocacy speech can NGOs carry? Which authority could be the guardian of a shared ethic? In the end, the question is how this addition of private initiatives (because NGOs are also private structures) can serve the general interest, that of suffering populations.

Summary

  • Editorial

Businesses and NGOs: the maturity of the debate – Boris Martin

  • Perspectives

Humanitarian aid in Palestine: reconsidering neutrality through child protection –  Joan Deas & Elise Reslinger

  • Focus : NGOS and the private sector: threat or opportunity? 

Are NGOs the sole purveyors of honourable intentions? – Mathieu Dufour

Reconciliating economics and social concerns: the example of arcenciel in Lebanon – Kristel Guyon

When NGOs and lucrative organisations collaborate: the economic integration of refugees in Ecuador – Lucie Laplace

Partnerships with private operators: the necessary debate among NGOs – Anne-Aël Pohu

  • Transitions

From resilience to localisation, or how slogans are not enough for an in-depth reform of the humanitarian sector – Perrine Laissus-Benoist & Benoît Lallau 

  • Innovations

New challenges in the context of violent urban settings – Oscar Felipe Chavez Aguirre

  • Reportage

Humanitarian Visa d’Or of the ICRC. 2011-2017 : seven years of reflection

  • Culture

Totally Brax
Books: A philosophical investigation and the “Plight of Hospitality” – Lessons from the past to better manage the future

 

To order the printed edition of the next issue

click here

Call for papers for Humanitarian Alternatives sixth issue

In the perspective of the publication of Humanitarian Alternatives sixth issue, in November 2017, the review is launching a call for papers on its Focus theme “Businesses and NGOs: alliance or defiance, threat or opportunity?” If you are an actor, a researcher or an observer of the international humanitarian community, and wish to submit a proposal for an article, please send us a summary and the outline of the paper (2 pages maximum) before July 17, 2017 to the following email: contact@alternatives-humanitaires.org. We will respond within 7 days following the receipt of your proposal.

The final deadline for submitting the article will be September 25, 2017. Please observe that the article must be around 15 000 signs (approximately 2,400 words).

Humanitarian Alternatives
N°6 – November 2017
« Focus » Theme
Businesses and NGOs: alliance or defiance, threat or opportunity?

For several years, the humanitarian ecosystem has been undergoing a transition. Alongside  traditional actors, the United Nations and NGOs in particular, the private sector (ie companies and company foundations) made a notable entry into the humanitarian field, either in the form of field actions or funding. More broadly, new practices (direct remittance of cash to populations, assistance delivered via lucrative networks [credit cards, mobile phones, drones, etc.] and, beyond that, managerial logics inspired by the business world [certification, evaluation, human resources management, “professionalisation”]) undoubtedly transform the aid sector.

Some see a risk of confusion when others commend a welcome extension of the actions in support of vulnerable populations, with NGOs now able to count on new partners with skills, technical means and funding that are beginning to cruelly lack.

In any case, this transformation generates many discussions and oppositions, sometimes symptomatic of a clash of cultures between companies and NGOs. And we will certainly not get out of it by falling back, as is too often the case today, on an opposition. Isn’t there a middle way between disparaging and the defence of a territory that belongs to no one?

The time has come for all of us to acknowledge this evolution. The aim of this issue is to present a global report on the situation and set the terms of a dialogue between companies and NGOs: is profit/not-for-profit still a relevant frontier? Should we impose limits on companies? What advocacy speech can NGOs carry? Which authority could be the guardian of a shared ethic? In the end, the question is how this addition of private initiatives (because NGOs are also private structures) can serve the general interest, that of suffering populations.

Coming soon the 5th issue “Africa: between shadow and light”

We are pleased to announce the publication of our next issue: “Africa: between shadow and light”

It will be available online by July 5th and in the printed version from July 10th.

Presentation of the 5th issue

Like humanity, it is in Africa where, in a way, the modern humanitarian aid was born. In 1968, almost 50 years ago, the embryo of MSF took shape in the reduced Biafra, challenging the ICRC’s hegemony. Above all, by pointing the spotlight on Africa, NGOs and the media unveiled what would almost become the “humanitarian continent” with its many famines and wars also nourishing a victim iconography. It is undoubtedly there when afro-pessimism was born. However, the continent recovered, facing immense challenges (such as the recent Ebola crisis), displaying an encouraging economic growth and exporting its various talents. A wave of afro-optimism then rose. But have we gone too far, too fast, in this pathway? By preferring the idea of ​​an afro-realism, this dossier proposes, without pretending to be exhaustive, to measure the scope of the perils that the continent will have to face, as much as the means it has to confront it. In other words, if the evils of Africa remain, have the humanitarian aid and the way of practicing changed?

Preview our next summary

  • Editorial

The challenges of humanitarian transition in Africa – Virginie Troit and Jean-François Mattei

  • Perspectives

Humanitarian aid as a deterrent in Greece – Arjun Claire

Sheltering, hosting or receiving refugees: the unresolved ambiguities of the La Linière refugee camp  – Franck Esnée and Michaël Neuman

  • Focus : Africa: between shadow and light

Sub-Saharan Africa: worrying clouds on the horizon – Serge Michailof
 
Senegal: The difficulty for NGOs to gain independence from the State – Sadio Ba Gning et Kelly Poulet

The impact of international proceedings for bypassing the State: the example of Madagascar – Christiane Rafidinarivo

  • Ethics

The ethics of care versus humanitarian exceptionalism – Arnaud Dandoy

  • Reportage

Afghan Stories : Waiting for Hope – Sandra Calligaro

  • Culture

Totally Brax

Film : Interview with Jonathan Littell – “Barbarity is well shared : no religion exerts a monopoly over it”

Books : Chronicle of a genocide – Development aid in 350 words – In times of remote-control war – Is humanitarianism on the decline? – A guide to fight against health inequalities

 

Barbara Hendricks’ speech at the European Parliament

March 21st 2017

On the 60th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome, Barbara Hendricks, singer and Honorary Ambassador for life of the United Nations High Commission for Refugees, makes a moving appeal for unity and mobilization for the promotion and defence of human rights before the European Parliament.

A strong and direct speech which remind each of us of our duty to act as “members of the family of Humanity” in order to face the humanitarian crisis we are currently experiencing and questions European citizens about the fraternal future we must build.

“From darkness to light
From injustice to justice
From war to peace
From fear to love
The stakes have never been higher.
We do not have the right to fail,
Not only for our children but for all of the children of the world.
Failure is simply unacceptable. “

A speech that allows to “vibrate with the same string” which last words are a tribute to refugee children, combining the worlds of a Somali refugee with the lyrics of Ella Fitzgerald (Summertime) and Motherless child composed in the United States before the abolition of slavery.

The entire speech is available here (Minute 06:00).

To go further: Also read Barbara Hendricks’ Tribune on the situation in Greece facing the massive arrivals of migrants: Barbara Hendricks, “Greece is an example of solidarity for Europe!”, Humanitarian Alternatives, n° 3, November 2016, p. 188-190, https://alternatives-humanitaires.org/en/2016/11/23/greece-is-an-example-of-solidarity-for- europe/